in any kind of shelter that could be got. A dozen of us were put into a small place, where we discovered a fireplace and some potatoes and onions. We soon had a roaring fire, and made ourselves a good "feed”. We also managed to get our clothes dried, and were pretty comfortable generally. But we were not aware that there was no chimney to the fireplace, with the result that the sparks set fire to the rafters, and we had to beat a hasty retreat in the morning. However, we managed to get the fire out before much damage was done. Then we had breakfast, and moved off again, but after going some distance we came up on some Algerian troops, and had to wait till their transport cleared off. Advancing again, we passed through a village and then across fields, where we took up a position beside a wood facing the Rivers Aisne. We were now advance guard for the division. The Germans were seen trying to blow up a bridge, but one platoon of our company was ordered to fire at a range of 2700 yards, and they had to shift without finishing their job.

COLD WORK — AND HOT

Rain again! We lay all the afternoon in a perfect downpour, while our artillery kept battering away till darkness came. Then we made for the road to a village where we were to billet. We lost our way, and all the chaps were “grousing” comparing a Saturday night at home with this — all in a jocular way, of course; but it was one of the most miserable nights I’ve experienced, and pitch dark. After some time (we had a very difficult path to traverse) we found our billet, where our cooks had tea ready for us — and we were ready for it. The next morning  we moved off again to near where we had been before, and lay in a field  waiting for a move. At last we advanced a bit into a wood, where we came in for some shelling; no damage done, however. Towards night we marched off again, and crossed the River Aisne by the bridge, which was partly destroyed; our transport crossed on a pontoon made by the Engineers. After going a short distance further we had a halt in a field for 

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